Chemically active fluid-bed process for sulphur removal during gasification of heavy fuel oil
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Chemically active fluid-bed process for sulphur removal during gasification of heavy fuel oil (third phase) by

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Published by Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Energy, Minerals, and Industry, Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in Research Triangle Park, N.C, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Petroleum as fuel.,
  • Petroleum -- Refining -- Desulphurization.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJ. W. T. Craig ... [et al.].
SeriesEnvironmental protection technology series ; EPA-600/2-76-248, Research reporting series -- EPA-600/2-76-248.
ContributionsCraig, J. W. E., Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (Research Triangle Park, N.C.)
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 596 p. :
Number of Pages596
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18013002M

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INTRODUCTION GENERAL The Chemically Active Fluid Bed. process is a means of avoiding sulphur oxide pollution while using heavy fuel oil for production of power. The process uses a fluidised bed of lime particles to convert the oil into a hot, low sulphur gas . chemically active fluid-bed process for sulphur removal during gasification of heavy fuel oil - second phase. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C., EPA/// Description. SECTION III INTRODUCTION GENERAL The Chemically Active Fluid Bed process is a means of avoiding sulphur oxide pollution while using heavy fuel oil for production of power. The process uses a fluidised bed of lime particles to convert the oil into a hot, low sulphur gas ready for combustion in an adjacent boiler. Combustion of heavy fuel oils is a major source of production of particulate emissions and ash, as well as considerable volumes of SOx and NOx. Gasification is a technologically advanced and environmentally friendly process of disposing heavy fuel oils by converting them into clean combustible gas products.

Yen-Hsiung Kiang, in Fuel Property Estimation and Combustion Process Characterization, Fluidized Bed Gasifier. For fluidized bed gasifiers, the biomass is fluidized in steam, hot gases, hot air, or hisn-alarum.com ashes are removed as fluidizing dry ashes or as heavy agglomerates. In dry ash gasifiers, the gasification temperatures are relatively low. It is particularly suitable for. The chapter describes the state-of-the-art of fluidized bed gasification of solid fuels, starting from the key role played by hydrodynamics, and its strong correlation with physical and chemical phenomena of the process and operating performance parameters of the hisn-alarum.com by: Some char particles are entrained in the raw syngas as its leaves the top of the gasifier, but are recovered and recycled back to the reactor via a cyclone. Ash particles, removed below the bed, give up heat to the incoming steam and recycle gas. At startup, the bed is . The centrifugal separator is used to separate two liquids, for example oil and water, or a liquid and solids as in contaminated oil. Separation is speeded up by the use of a centrifuge and can be arranged as a continuous process. Where a centrifuge is arranged to .

These are: capacity, distance for the gas to travel, required cleanliness of the gas, and coal characteristics. Three gasification processes, which are suitable for converting coal to fuel gas, are described: the FW-Stoic two-stage gasifier, the Esso Chemically Active Fluid Bed, and the U-Gas Industrial Fuel Gas hisn-alarum.com: Michael J. Shires. Get this from a library! Chemically active fluid-bed process for sulphur removal during gasification of heavy fuel oil: fourth phase. [A W Ramsden; Z Kowszun; Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (Research Triangle Park, N.C.); Esso Research Centre.]. Gasification is a flexible process with regard to the fuel type that can be used. This means that a large range of fuel can be gasified. It has been concluded that the atomic ratio of C 10 H 14 O 6 is relatively stable for all biomass types; therefore, the type of biomass used is considered to have a low effect on the syngas composition [27]. High-Temperature Sulfur Removal in Gasification Applications Raghubir Gupta Warm Gas Sulfur Removal Sorbent Development Process Development Compatibility with other contaminant removal Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell MCFC Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Chemical Production E+3 E+1 E+0 E-1 E-2 E