Property rights and economic reform in China
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Property rights and economic reform in China

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Published by Stanford University Press in Stanford, Calif .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Right of property -- China -- Congresses,
  • Government ownership -- China -- Congresses,
  • Privatization -- China -- Congresses

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Jean C. Oi and Andrew G. Walder.
GenreCongresses.
ContributionsWalder, Andrew George., Oi, Jean Chun.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHB711 .P736 1999
The Physical Object
Paginationxiv, 354 p. ;
Number of Pages354
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15472193M
ISBN 100804734569, 0804737886
LC Control Number99011806
OCLC/WorldCa40610555

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China s rapid economic growth during the past two decades has occurred without the systematic privatization programs once urged upon the former Communist regimes of Europe and the USSR. Some observers have argued that this shows that changes in property rights are not important in reforming a command economy; others insist that in China a façade of public ownership hides . China’s rapid economic growth during the past two decades has occurred without the systematic privatization programs once urged upon the former Communist regimes of Europe and the USSR. Some observers have argued that this shows that changes in property rights are not important in reforming a command economy; others insist that in China a façade of public ownership hides . Get this from a library! Property rights and economic reform in China. [Jean C Oi; Andrew G Walder;] -- "The contributors to this volume, from the fields of anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology, have all conducted fieldwork in China on specific economic sectors or enterprise types. China's rapid economic growth during the past two decades has occurred without the systematic privatization programs once urged upon the former Communist regimes of Europe and the USSR. Some observers have argued that this shows that changes in property rights are not important in reforming a command economy; others insist that in China a façade of public ownership hides a.

Comment: Property Rights and Development: The Moral Dimension Jo Ann Kwong Comment: Reforming China’s Property System Chen Weishu 9. Private Provision of Government Services Gabriel Roth Comment: The "Socialization" of Public Services Zhou Mingwei Economic Growth and Reform in China’s Provinces, Municipalities, and Regions Thomas R. Dye. Chinese property law has existed in various forms for centuries. After the Chinese Communist Revolution in , most land is owned by collectivities or by the state; the Property Law of the People's Republic of China passed in codified property rights. Almost four decades ago, China began reforming property rights concerning agricultural land by moving away from a communal system of farming towards a system of private use rights for individual households. This process of property rights reform in China has since continued in waves, allowing for freer market exchanges over agricultural land. Addressing these questions, this book provides a positive explanation of the reform in China’s railway sector between and the dissolution of the Ministry of Railways. It bridges the socialist reform and transport policy literature, and studies the empirical changes of the property rights arrangements in China’s railway system.

Get this from a library! Property rights and economic reform in China. [Jean Chun Oi; Andrew G Walder;] -- Revisions of papers presented at a conference at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Download Citation | Property Rights and Economic Reform in China | 1. Property rights in the Chinese economy: contours of the process of change . The End of Economic Reform in China? The book is divided into five chapters, each filled with extensive private property rights protected by a genuine rule of law and an.   (Photo: Flickr user PaulSchliebs). By Xingyuan Feng, Christer Ljungwall, and Yeliang Xia. This article originally appeared in the International Property Rights Index report, a project of the Property Rights Alliance.. In , China became the world’s second largest economy in terms of GDP and joined the list of middle-income economies with a per .