Cover of: Services Industries and the Knowledge-based Economy (Industry Canada Research) | Read Online
Share

Services Industries and the Knowledge-based Economy (Industry Canada Research)

  • 674 Want to read
  • ·
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Univ of Calgary Pr .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Economics - General,
  • Business & Economics,
  • Canada,
  • Service industries,
  • Services (Industrie),
  • Business/Economics

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsRichard G. Lipsey (Editor), Alice O. Nakumura (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages615
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL12017707M
ISBN 101552381498
ISBN 109781552381496

Download Services Industries and the Knowledge-based Economy (Industry Canada Research)

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Over the past two decades, the service sector have increased dramatically and now occupy the largest share of the economy of advanced industrial societies. Certain business services are regularly cited as evidence for the emergence of a "knowledge economy." In this pioneering book, leading researchers in the fields of service industries and innovation studies investigate the reasons for the. Note: Citations are based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study. The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied. Main Services Industries and the Knowledge-based Economy (Industry Canada Research) Services Industries and the Knowledge-based Economy (Industry Canada Research) Richard G. Lipsey, . Jul 23,  · Certain business services are regularly cited as evidence for the emergence of a "knowledge economy". In this pioneering book, leading researchers in the fields of service industries and innovation studies investigate the reasons for the growth of the service sectors and this emergent knowledge hisn-alarum.com Edition: 1st Edition.

Austrian-American economist Fritz Machlup first proposed and popularized the ideas of knowledge industries and the knowledge economy in his book The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States. Since the publication of that book, many economists have begun to refine the idea of the knowledge industry. The knowledge economy (or the knowledge-based economy) is the use of knowledge to create goods and services. In particular, it refers to a high portion of skilled workers in the economy of a locality, country, or the world, and the idea that most jobs require specialized skills. Services Industries and the Knowledge-based Economy (Industry Canada Research) [Richard Lipsey, Alice Nakamura] on hisn-alarum.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Services industries account for almost three-quarters of both gross domestic product and employment in CanadaFormat: Paperback. It may also be considered a knowledge driven economy, i.e. economy in which knowledge (its outlays and shape) becomes more important determinant of the rate and level of growth than outlays and volume of fixed assets. Learn more in: SME's Innovation and Internationalization in .

Services and the Knowledge-Based Economy. Book. Full-text available. the relative ease for migrants to obtain employment in some areas of the services industries, especially hospitality. We define the knowledge economy as production and services based on knowledge-intensive activities that contribute to an accelerated pace of technical and scientific advance, as well as rapid. The broad label ”knowledge economy” covers a wide array of activities and interpretations. At least three lines of research fall under this umbrella. The oldest approach, with its origins dating back to the early s, focuses on the rise of new science-based industries and their role in social and economic change. Mar 19,  · He argues there is too little of it not only in developing nations like Brazil, but also in advanced economies like the United States. Here Unger argues that the knowledge economy is confined to too few regions (think New York City and Silicon Valley) and too few industries (e.g., software and financial services).Author: Robert D. Atkinson.